Police Using Your DNA from Ancestry Sites to Their Advantage

You would have to be living under a rock to not have heard about the new fad of having your DNA tested to see who your ancestors were. In fact, a certain presidential candidate who lied for years about her “American Indian” ancestry so she could personally profit from it, had her DNA test spectacularly backfire.

But one thing that most people don’t realize is that some of these DNA testing sites are now actively sharing their databases — of their customers’ DNA — with law enforcement agencies.

That should raise huge red flags with anyone who still cares about their personal privacy in our modern-day Orwellian surveillance society. The problem is that many of these companies are not obtaining consent from their customers before uploading their DNA and sharing it with law enforcement.

This seems like a Fourth Amendment lawsuit just waiting to happen. Unless a person consents to submit a DNA test to law enforcement (which is stupid from a legal standpoint), investigators have to get a warrant to obtain a DNA sample. The only exception to this is in states that are actively collecting DNA samples from convicted prison inmates.

The dirty trick that’s baked into this cake is that when police collect DNA samples from crime sites, they now go fishing on ancestry websites. And if one of your relatives has had their DNA tested, you could be arrested and charged based on the dubious science of DNA matching.

Check out the report below from the always-insightful Ben Swann as he explains why you should never give your DNA to these companies.


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